Book Review and Interview: Joshua and the Shadow of Death

A couple of months ago, I was asked to write a book review on the first novel in the Berserker Series called Joshua and the Shadow of Death by author Gary McPherson. Unlike most of the literature that I spotlight and/or review on this blog page, which generally consists of a combination of published medical research, chronic illness self-help books, and occasionally other forms of scientific or non-fiction-type writing, Joshua and the Shadow of Death is a fictional thriller that is premised on resolving the mystery behind the suicide of Harold’s adoptive father, Richard Brown, as written from the perspective of the family’s psychiatrist and personal friend, Joshua Zeev. In cohorts with Dr. Zeev to resolve the remaining questions left behind in the wake of Mr. Brown’s tragic death, a significant portion of the story-line of this book centers on Harold’s (or Harry as Dr. Zeev calls him) mental health and controlling the symptoms of a rare, hereditary psychological disorder known as Berserker Rage Syndrome or Blind Rage Syndrome.

The chief symptoms of Berserker Rage include “sudden, impulsive, uncharacteristic violence” in which “the usually nonviolent, peaceable patient savagely assaults others (often strangers); experiences amnesia during episodes of ‘blind rage’; angrily overreacts to an actual external stimulus toward which the rage is directed; episodically exhibits extraordinary physical strength and relative immunity to injury; and is, by definition, not under the influence of drugs or alcohol, brain damaged, nor suffering from other major mental illnesses” (Diamong, 1996, p. 167-168). This exhibition of both violent and aggressive behavior amid those affected with Berserker Syndrome, however, theoretically results from the presence of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genetic variants – some of which have traced back to the historically debated “Berserker Vikings,” a legendary and “sinister brotherhood of warriors” originating from Scandinavia that were perceived social outcasts because they burgeoned “on the border between life and death, fueled by war and distinguished by the ecstatic battle fury” while stuck in trance-like state (Hjardar, 2018, para. 2). Interestingly enough, my own genetic testing affirmed that I also have what is called “The Warrior Gene,” which is extremely fitting considering the amount anger, rage, and frustration I have personally experienced not only in learning to live with multiple rare medical conditions, but also in learning how to deal with the difficulties in communicating my own pain and symptoms to friends, family, and the medical community as a whole.

At this point in time, the American Psychiatric Association has yet to formally categorize the constellation of symptoms associated with Berserker Rage Syndrome as its own entity in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) outside of the more general psychiatric diagnosis of Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED), which is a type of “impulse control disorder marked by problems controlling emotions and behaviors, and result in behaviors that violate social norms and the rights of others” (Coccaro, 2018, para. 1). However, Berserker Rage Syndrome is still clinically perceived as a legitimate psychiatric condition by many mental health experts, who argue the difference between the two conditions is that Berserker’s includes the genetic predisposition towards violent and aggressive behavior and thus programmed into the nervous systems of Berserker patients via explicit heredity patterns as demonstrated in a multitude of other physiological and psychological behaviors and disorders throughout human evolution. Accordingly, one of the primary challenges in unravelling the conspiracy behind Mr. Brown’s suicide concerns Harold’s ability to not only overcome the overwhelming sense of grief and loss over the death of his adoptive father (and, later, his mother), but also learning how to deal with the functional limitations of a mental health condition that’s no fault of his own in order to have the strength uncover the surprising and truths hiding just beneath the surface of consciousness in this novel.

In addition to being given an opportunity to both read and review this book, however, I was also provided the privilege of interviewing the author of Joshua and the Shadow of Death, Gary McPherson, to converse about his own experiences in living and working with a chronic rare condition called Behcet’s Disease (along with some other chronic comorbidities) as well. For those of you who aren’t familiar with Behcet’s, this syndrome is best described as “a rare, chronic, autoimmune, autoinflammatory disorder of unknown origin. Its manifestations are thought to be caused by vasculitis resulting in damage to blood vessels throughout the body” (American Behcet’s Disease Association, 2014, para. 1). The principal symptoms presenting in this condition include the onset of flu-like symptoms, painful round or oval sores on the mouth and/or genitals, acne-like sores and pus-filled lesions on the skin, nodule development on the front-side of the legs, eye inflammation or blurred vision, vasculitis or thrombophlebitis in both the small and large veins, central nervous system dysfunction, and joint pain, swelling, or redness just to name a few (Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, 2018). Although Behcet’s is clearly a physiological disorder in nature – as opposed to Berserker’s Rage Syndrome, which is a psychiatric condition – there is still a definitive connection between the author’s personal history both in being adopted and later receiving a diagnosis of a relatively rare genetic disease and the character development of Harold. As with most things in life, we all know there is often some hidden truth laying buried within the fiction and the line used to separate physiological and psychological ailments is vividly fine at best. Nonetheless, here are McPherson’s answers to my interview questions pertaining to how this devastatingly rare, genetic disorder impacted his life and work – both leading up to and following diagnosis.

In the press release released by JKS Communications, it states that you did not receive a diagnosis of Behcet’s disease until you were 32 years old. When did you first start to experience symptoms and how long were you “undiagnosed” for afterward?

I first exhibited symptoms at 9 weeks old. I had crops of sores coating my mouth and throat that lasted a couple of weeks, according to my mother. I was unable to take a bottle. It was very traumatic for her. I continued to have those symptoms, including very high fevers, very high white blood cell counts, and other symptoms up until I contracted Uveitis at age 32. Uveitis led the doctors down the correct path to my diagnosis.

How many doctors did you visit before you received a diagnosis?

In the year they diagnosed me alone there was a team of five ophthalmologists, my primary care, and a team of rheumatologists—I dealt only with the rheumatologists’’ expertise in Behcet’s.

Did any of your doctors minimize your symptoms and/or infer that your condition was “all in your head”? If so, how did that make you feel at the time and did it influence your career as a writer?

The bigger issue was doctors misdiagnosing. I have been tested for everything from Herpes to Leukemia to AIDS. That experience did influence my writing of Joshua and the Shadow of Death. Joshua’s misdiagnosis and trial and error with Harold’s childhood are part of what drives Joshua’s narrative in this first novel.

What was the hardest part about waiting for a diagnosis?

Being adopted, I never knew if it was a common genetic problem, or worse if it was something I could pass on to my spouse. There were times I wondered if I would survive, with good reasons. I once survived a fever of 110 degrees. When I was diagnosed at age 32 the symptoms were so advanced; I was given less than 5 years. That was 20 years ago. I keep telling my doctors to hang in there, one of these years they’ll be correct.

The press release also mentions that your “battle with Behcet’s, which has also caused Fibromyalgia and Fibromatosis, make it difficult to physically type” and “slow” down your writing process. What type of things help you to overcome the physical limitations of your conditions on really bad symptom days?

When people would ask me this question in the past, I used to joke that it was better living through Chemistry. Unfortunately, my body is now resistant to common, opioid-based, pain medicines. There are a couple of muscle relaxers I can tolerate in very low doses. Unfortunately, the way I deal with it today is to stop writing when I have a really bad day. To help offset this, I try to take advantage of the good days. On average, I can get in two hours a day, three days a week before needing to take a day off. In the winter it’s less than that.

Do you find it easier to work through pain or take a break if your body is telling you to do so?

I have learned it is better to take a break. I used to try to fight through it. The result was either gibberish on the page or a version of writer’s cramp that would lock my fingers in place for up to two days, even with muscle relaxers. Dealing with the ever-progressive pain has been the toughest part at this point in my life. In my younger days, I worked as an IT Manager, and I was full speed for 365 days a year. It’s been tough learning to put on the tortoiseshell and slow down.

Which symptom(s) do you think limits your ability to write/work?

I have tendonitis and Fibromyalgia in my hands. Also, I have neuropathy in my forearms. All three of those together are what stop my writing on a normal day. Although Behcet’s has taken its toll, it’s these secondary symptoms and diseases that have finally knocked me down several notches. In addition, I injured my back when I was in my early 20’s. Behcet’s loves to go after areas that are already damaged. So, sitting or standing for too long can make me forget about my hands, in a bad way.

There are a lot of running themes and interesting characters, relationships, and critical subjects that are touched on throughout Joshua and the Shadow of Death. How did your personal experiences in having a rare disease and other chronic illnesses influence you to include these elements in the book during the writing process?

For the first book in this series, I wanted to do something different. I’m telling the story from the doctor’s point of view, as opposed to the characters with the disease. By thinking through how people see me and my challenges, Joshua and the Shadow of Death gave me an opportunity to allow the reader, and myself, to experience what it is like to have an unknown condition from the viewpoint of people close to the patient, as opposed to the patient. Of course, this is a mystery thriller, so I took that relationship dynamic and placed it into the thriller narrative.

Out all the main characters in the book, who do you think you personally resemble the most and why?

I love answering this question because it is an easy one. Harold is 100% me. From his sense of humor, his need to protect his friends and family, to his medical condition. I only wish I was 6 foot 5 instead of 5 foot 8.

Was there a reason that developed the plotline of the book around psychiatric illness rather than chronic illness? If so, why?

There is a twist to my real-life story. I am adopted. My adoption left us with a big mystery even after successfully diagnosing Behcet’s. It is very rare in the U.S. 25,000, give or take, but in the Middle-East and East, it is a common disease. My bright blue eyes, fair skin, and bald head with a touch of gray on the side do not appear to be all that Eastern. For the disease, it turns out my unknown father was of Turkish descent. My birth mother had immigrated to the U.S. with her family from Denmark, so I’m half Danish. Being half anything in the U.S. is exciting since, as Bill Murray put it once in Stripes, “We’re all mutts.” Researching Dane’s history brought me to the Vikings and the Berserkers. That gave me the idea of creating two orphan half-brothers who did not know they were berserkers in modern-day America. This series gives me the ability to pull in every angle of my life.

Do you know anyone, or have you ever met anyone, with Berserker/Blind Rage Syndrome?

There are a lot of stories with people going “Berserk” in battle or emergencies in contemporary times. The Berserker in this series is a combination of fiction and fact. I researched original legends, as well as original “accounts” by the Vikings as well as their enemies. I also researched modern-day examples of people going “Berserk.”  I took all this information and created a modern-day Berserker.

Managing health and wellness when you have a chronic illness and/or rare disease is often maddening at times and it’s easy to see how you made the connection between the Berserker Legend and Behcet’s Disease. Has your experience with have Behcet’s Disease, Fibromyalgia, and Fibromatosis ever sent you into an episode of rage? If so, can you give an example and discuss how the episode was resolved?

When I was young, crops of mouth sores were common. Growing up in the ’60s, ‘70s and early ‘80s, roughhousing was common. Unfortunately, hitting me in my mouth when I had sores always triggered a rage. My older brother, who could easily take me as a kid, ended up on the wrong end of my rage one day. He accidentally hit my mouth when we were roughhousing, and I ended up knocking out one of his baby teeth. He got tooth fairy money, so it ended okay. Normally I would hit inanimate objects as I do not hit people as a habit.

Do you have any advice for those living an undiagnosed physical or mental illness on how to get a proper diagnosis and/or the best medical care?

Be your own advocate. Make sure you keep copies of your medical records. There is a lot of groupthink in the medical community. If you have a rare, or unknown disease, try and find a doctor who is open-minded and willing to research every possibility around your condition.

I would add there is a new wrinkle with modern medicine: WebMD and other online medical sites. One of the worst things you can do is tell your doctor you read something online. The exception to this scenario is finding information from medical colleges. I was very fortunate; I started my career at Microsoft in 1992. I had access to the internet before people knew what that was. When I was diagnosed in 1997, I knew how to query and bring up research papers from places like MIT or Boston College. Take the time to educate yourself on how to find medical information your doctor will value. My doctors were always impressed with the medical school articles I would bring to them when I had questions on experimental treatments or possible complications.

What advice would you give to other inspiring writers that may be suffering from a chronic and/or rare disease?

First, if you want to earn an income writing, this is a marathon, not a race. Even healthy people can take years to see their work produce an income that will support them. My financial goal with writing is to one day be self-supporting again.  As I like to say, at 52 I prefer to be depositing into Social Security, not requesting an early withdrawal because my body has managed to disable itself.

Let’s put aside economics and focus on the craft. The most important advice I can give is this, permit yourself to work at your own pace and style. That action will set you free to write the way that works best you. The biggest killer to the creative process, in any discipline, is the inability to create in your way. (G. McPherson, personal communication, December 7, 2018).

If you’d like to purchase a copy of Joshua and the Shadow of Death,

please visit one of the following online retail locations:

References:

American Behcet’s Disease Association (2014). Behcet’s Disease. Retrieved from http://www.behcets.com/site/c.8oIJJRPsGcISF/b.9196317/k.904C/Behcets_Disease.htm

Coccaro, E. (2018). Intermittent Explosive Disorder in Adults: Treatment and Prognosis. Retrieved from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/intermittent-explosive-disorder-in-adults-treatment-and-prognosis

Diamond, S.A. (1996). Anger, Madness, and the Daimonic: The Psychological Genesis of Violence, Evil, and Creativity. New York: State University of New York Press.

DNAexplained (2013). The Warrior Gene. Retrieved from https://dna-explained.com/2013/06/16/the-warrior-gene/

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center (2018). Behcet Disease. Retrieved from https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/848/behcet-disease

JKS Communications (2018). Gary McPherson Examines the Beast Within in His Breakthrough Thriller. Retrieved from https://www.jkscommunications.com/gary-mcpherson-examines-the-beast-within-in-his-breakthrough-thriller/

McPherson, Gary (2018). Joshua and the Shadow of Death. Charlotte, NC: Author.

McPherson, Gary (2018). The Berserker Series. Retrieved from https://gmacwriter.com/

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