Oh doctor, doctor, I must have gotten this sick somehow. I’m going to ask you a series of questions, and I want them answered on the spot, right now.

Patience has never been a virtue of mine, as many of my friends and family can attest to.

But I feel that I have been extremely patient with my doctors, maybe more than I should be.

I wasn’t planning to do an update until I received the final confirmation from my doctors,

but it seems like that won’t be happening anytime soon,

so I figured that no time is better than the present.

It’s been just about a month since my abnormal tests came back. I have left multiple messages for both doctors, one every week, hoping for a callback or at least an idea as to whether or not I need to come in for an appointment to discuss the test results in person.However, all I got was silence. I literally felt my blood boiling each day that went by that I didn’t receive a call. 

I’d whine about how:

“They’re delaying my care.”

“Sure, just because I’ve been sick forever, no reason to rush or anything.”

“I don’t know how doctors can get away with not calling when tests are abnormal.”

And, of course, the classic:

“I’m going to die before they ever figure out what this is.”

I was feeling sorry for myself, to say the least. I felt alone, abandoned, and lost as to what to do next. It was really starting to mess with my head. I hated being this way but I hated how these doctors were making me feel even more.

I felt like they were completely disregarding everything I have gone through

in my search for a diagnosis.

The years of life I have lost due to being sick.

The hours spent driving to appointments.

The amount of time in hospitals and doctor’s offices.

The high levels of radiation and all the discomfort in medical testing.

The countless pills prescribed, which often caused more side-effects than actual relief.

The procedures and surgeries, which also didn’t fix my disease.

The friends and family I lost, because they didn’t understand.

My career goals and aspirations that have been placed on hold.

Everything I once was and what I could be.

My whole life is on hold!

And here, right in front of you, are these abnormal tests

that provide answers to my chronic, undiagnosed illness

that I’ve fought so hard, for so long, to find

and you can’t pick up the phone to call me? 

Maybe I am being impractical,

but a month spent waiting seems way too long.

That’s a month to complete more testing or get second opinions.

Four weeks of treatment or management.

30 days of my life lost, left waiting.

FINALLY, a nurse from my GI, Rheumatologist/Immunologist, and Cardiologist’s office called, but she only caused  more confusion and frustration than before. She tells me my fecal cultures came back normal, which I already knew. She then says my cortisol levels were low (again, I’ve had my test results for weeks) and the doctor would like me to rerun it to be sure. She’s going to mail the paperwork so I can at least have my blood drawn in town, instead of driving over an hour. Great, thank you. She also tells me to stop taking my lupus medications… wait, what? The GI doctor and the Rheumatologist/Immunologist agree that I should stop taking them, because I’m not autoimmune. Um… ok. How come she originally, as did all the other doctors, think it was seronegative autoimmune disease? Specifically, Lupus?  I’m not in the mood to argue, I’ve been feeling terrible. I ask if I stop them forever, she says yes and the conversation is over.

She calls again yesterday, just to tell me to stop taking the Lupus medications… again. Yes, you told me the day before. Both doctors think it may be causing my painful and urgent diarrhea.Um, I have had on and off urgent diarrhea for… like… ever. But ok. So it’s not because it can’t possibly be autoimmune? I’m confused. She asks if the medication has helped. I said I’m over the initial side effects. I’ve had constipation for the past few days, so don’t think it’s causing diarrhea, and I haven’t had any extreme photosensitivity as in the past weeks, but still having outbreaks of rashes. I don’t know what is causing what anymore. My symptoms are too random and sporadic. She says to call next week or the week after, let them know if being off the medication makes me feel better or not, and then we will restart it if it’s not the problem. Wait… so let me get this straight? Now you’re taking me off it, to see if it’s having side effects I have had forever, only to restart it and have to adjust to it once again? Are you kidding me? Well, it may be affecting your cortisol levels, so they want to see if I stop it if it’ll change my blood test.  I am beyond confused and frustrated at this point. I went and redid my cortisol blood test this morning, so I guess we’ll just wait and see what that tells us.

Still haven’t gotten a call from the vascular surgeon. My CT Angiography was the one I was MOST worried about and  I fretted every night about him not calling me to discuss the findings. . Finally fed up, having left four messages now, I called and scheduled an appointment to discuss. I don’t know whether or not I trust him to treat at this point, given the lack of respect of promised phone calls with no answers, but he may just not know what to do or say about the finding. This is the doctor who didn’t believe in Nutcracker Syndrome at all for his own, valid reasoning, but admitted my original CT Scan showed the most convincing case of Nutcracker Syndrome that he has seen in over 30 years. He ran the CTA to “prove him wrong”. On the order form for the test, he even wrote “to exclude Nutcracker Syndrome”, instead of “evaluate for Nutcracker Syndrome”. He was really convinced I couldn’t have it, it’s too rare, and most vascular surgeons don’t think it’s a real thing.

Well, guess what? I proved him wrong. Not only that, they found two more (even rarer)  vascular compressions. The radiologist noted both May-Thurner Syndrome and Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome, although the Nutcracker Syndrome is the most extensive. So perhaps, maybe he is lost as to what to do or say at this point, I don’t know. But I’d rather him tell me that if that is, in fact, the case, rather than be silent about it. But I have an appointment now, so he can’t ignore me. So we’ll see how that goes.

I also had my consultation with cardiology last week. It had gone way better than expected and I really liked the doctor. He not only listened to me, he caught things other cardiologists had  missed in the past, and had my notes completed (and accurate) by the end of the day. I was fearful for this appointment, as I have not had the best luck with cardiologists in the past. They always say they hear a “murmur” or “valve issue”, order tests, and then call me crazy. This has happened on multiple occasions, both in my teens and early twenties. So you can see how I’d be nervous about going straight into an appointment saying “I think I have POTS syndrome and so does my neurologist and the immunologist (although she seems to have forgotten EVERYTHING she told me in my last appointment, so maybe she doesn’t think I do anymore, who knows)”. I show him the letter from the neurologist and my ‘poor man’s tilt table test’ results. He says that it looks like I have POTS, but he wanted to have some “orthostatic fun” in the office just to see. He measured my heart rate and blood pressure while laying down, sitting up, and standing.  Sure enough, my blood pressure dropped really low and my heart rate increased up to 150. Yep, he’s pretty convinced that it is POTS, but because of the missed information in previous cardio tests, he wants to rerun them again just to make sure it’s not something “easier” or misdiagnosed.

In my echocardiograms from 2005 and 2007,  he noticed that there was what he called “abnormal electricity” shown, but the EKG didn’t catch it, so it was dismissed. It happened again in my 3D echo from last year. Also, the 3D echo from 2014 showed I had pericarditis, which is a typical sign of autoimmune (particularly Lupus), but, of course, need to rule out other possible causes as well. And finally, my halter monitor from 2007 showed abnormalities and heart beats exceeding 160 bp, which was also dismissed during that time. So he ordered a 3D echo again, to see if the pericarditis has cleared on its own or if it’s gotten worse. He also wants to evaluate the possibility of a hole in my heart (which many people are born with, although it usually clears up on its own as you get older) since they can’t confirm the cause of my hypoxemia, other than the mild sleep apnea that was confirmed through my sleep study last year (although he doesn’t believe that is what is causing it, because again, it was very mild and happens sporadically during the daytime as well). So I’ll be back in the hospital tomorrow to complete all of these cardio tests. If  all the differential diagnoses are excluded, then he will be referring me to the dysautonomia clinic for further treatment, but was comfortable enough to put down Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome as an official diagnosis. Again, something I have been saying since I started looking for answers. Finally! So we’ll see how testing goes tomorrow and I guess go from there.


So what does this all mean?

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It’s more than just ONE cause, obviously.

There are multiple conditions feeding off of one another, 

making my conditions not only rare,

but also complicated to treat and manage.

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Here’s what is on the table (so far):

Dysautonomia:

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More specifically —> Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS):

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Nutcracker Syndrome:

“The nutcracker syndrome is quite a rare condition. It is due to the compression of the distal segment of the left renal vein (LRV) between the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and the aorta (also called left renal vein entrapment).  This syndrome needs treatment when symptoms are disabling” (Hartung, O., 2009, p. 246).

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Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome (SMAS):

“Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is a digestive condition that occurs when the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) is compressed between two arteries (the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery). This compression causes partial or complete blockage of the duodenum. Signs and symptoms may include abdominal fullness; bloating after meals; nausea and vomiting; and abdominal cramping that may be helped by lying in certain positions.” (NIH Office of Rare Diseases, 2014)

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May-Thurner Syndrome:

“May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is caused when the left iliac vein is compressed by the right iliac artery, which increases the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left extremity. DVT is a blood clot that may partially or completely block blood flow through the vein. Even though DVT itself is not life-threatening, the blood clot has the potential to break free and travel through the bloodstream, where it can become lodged in the blood vessels of the lung (known as a pulmonary embolism). This can be a life-threatening condition” (ClevelandClinic.org)

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Symptoms and Causes of Low Cortisol Levels:

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A lower than normal level may indicate:

  • Addison disease, in which the adrenal glands do not produce enough cortisol
  • Hypopituitarism, in which the pituitary gland does not signal the adrenal gland to produce enough cortisol
  • Suppression of normal pituitary or adrenal function by glucocorticoid medications including pills, skin creams, eyedrops, inhalers, joint injections, chemotherapy

Other conditions for which the test may be ordered include:


Is this a final diagnosis?

Knowing how thing have gone in the past, it’s  highly doubtful.

Maybe there is more to the story…

Maybe there is less significance…

Only time will tell.

Again, I am left waiting…


Now if only I can get all my doctors organized and working together, maybe I can clear up what this all means and what needs to be done next. Surgery? Medications? Again, who knows… 

While I DO know for sure that NONE of these diagnoses will ever be “cured”, I’m hoping we can at least find a way to manage everything so I could hopefully live a semi-normal life again.

I still have to do a hydrogen/methane breath test next week, as well as upcoming appointments the week after with dermatology (to run biopsies on my skin rashes, hopefully to “catch” the autoimmune disease that’s hiding in my skin) and a follow-up with the vascular surgeon. Plus the results from the cortisol testing I did today and the cardio tests tomorrow. Let’s hope we can get the pieces put all together and figure out what’s next as far as treatment goes.

I guess I’ll just have to wait… something that is unfortunately becoming entirely too common at this point, but at least we’re getting somewhere… slowly. 

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7 thoughts on “Oh doctor, doctor, I must have gotten this sick somehow. I’m going to ask you a series of questions, and I want them answered on the spot, right now.

  1. sunshinesbeauty says:

    Sigh. I’m so sorry you are having to deal with so much back and forth. One thing about it, if it is Lupus, coming off of the Plaquenil will cause you to flare and you will feel like sh…poop. lol,I tried that once myself and failed miserably. I hope they get their stuff together for you soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Undiagnosed Warrior says:

      I was feeling pretty terrible the day they took me off, so it’s hard to say. I’m hoping that the dermatologist can shed some light into WHAT would be causing the skin issues (including butterfly rash) and alopecia if it’s NOT Lupus. We shall see. My hands are a red, swollen, blistery mess already.

      Like

  2. Elizabeth B. says:

    They took you off medication cold turkey?! I really hope you were on a small dose. Even meds that I’m on a low dose of tend to be tapered off of… so I don’t crash and my body doesn’t flip out. Sorry you’re dealing with that.

    Also, small note of potential hope: My cardio says that the cases of POTS he sees (I have it too) tend to be self-limited, so they’ll go away. I haven’t been able to find much about that online, at least not for young adults as opposed to teens. But I’m holding out hope that mine will reverse itself after treatment, maybe your’s will too? I’ll keep my fingers crossed for you.

    I’d probably look for new docs at this point if I was you. I really hate searching for docs, which is why I currently am just seeing specialists instead of a PCP (I have one listed, but I don’t really care for them)… but if your specialists are the ones giving you issues, I would def recommend finding new ones. You deserve answers, or at least docs that are willing to say “not really sure what to do with this, maybe we can try this or we could try this?” (I’ve had a few docs say that, and even though it’s frustrating to stump specialists, it’s nice to have them willing to admit it.)

    Good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

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